In the survey we had identified an issue with trapped water under the cockpit floor as well as potential rot in a bulkhead. To help get to these issues and to address a lack of stowage on the boat for outboards, sails, gear and the like, we had decided early on that we would cut out the center cockpit floor.

The Pit of Despair

In the survey we had identified an issue with trapped water under the cockpit floor as well as potential rot in a bulkhead.  To help get to these issues and to address a lack of stowage on the boat for outboards, sails, gear and the like, we had decided early on that we would cut out the center cockpit floor.  On doing so, we were able to remove 200kg of loose water from under the cockpit – a whole bunch of free-surface effect that was most unwelcome, was now gone. We were also able to access the area of the bulkhead we were concerned had rot.  It did … a lot … but it was not a bulkhead! A piece of marine grade ply had been attached to the back of the main composite bulkhead, presumably to appease some class rule or another. It was this that had trapped the water. Serving no useful purpose and having no structural significance, it was ghosted.

A new deck was fitted in the cockpit with access hatches.

Speaking about access, the old companionway was just large enough to allow you to drop your bag inside – but good luck trying to fish it out of the bilge afterwards.  It was the next thing to face the saw and while we were at it, the insets for the new clutches were also opened up.

A new fairing around the companionway was installed,
as were the inserts for the clutches.

And then priming and painting.
The pit of despair was now the cockpit of tranquility …