With the boat out of the water and no clear information on when the rudders or shafts were last pulled, we decided to dive into doing that – more a maintenance than refit undertaking …. or so we thought …. Dropping out the starboard rudder went smoothly, but the shaft was showing a concerning amount of corrosion.  The port rudder was a nightmare.  The shaft was fused to the bearing and the whole was turning (quite freely) inside the structure holding it.  We had to cut free the shaft from the bearing.  Again, the shaft showed significant corrosion.

We now turned to the propeller shafts.  We did not have high hopes and sure enough there was corrosion, not nearly as bad as the rudder stocks, but bad enough.  The cutlass bearings were also in a bad state.  Fortunately, the props themselves were in good condition as were their anodes – go figure.

To address this, we had new shafts machined for the rudder stocks and the prop shafts.  New cutlass bearings were ordered as were new bearings for the rudders.  To compliment all this, new rudders were built around the new stocks taking advantage of the skills of our project manager / naval architect to optimize the foil shape by reducing the chord a little and increasing their depth to the maximum that would still see them protected by the skeg. With that, the bulk of the work on the hulls was done … except for the bows …